Newsprint Comic – Part 1

I picked up some newsprint this week, with the intention of drawing some color comics. In the early days, comics appeared in newspapers and were printed on newsprint (duh). Ink tended to run and blot, so artists had to simplify their drawings by eliminating cross hatching and tight line work. There is something very appealing about the simplicity of that approach.

I also miss the comic books that were printed on newsprint – they smelled good, and the limitations imposed by the printing medium made them appealing. Sure, they were fragile, and today’s comics off much brighter colors and many more options. That’s fine – I’m just a bit nostalgic for the 35¢ price tag and artwork.

This was an exercise in quick execution. It’s likely a storyboard for moving images.

To be continued…

The Boss

I’ve been thinking about Boss Guitar Pedals lately. They make a fine story.




Up next: Mary Marvel makes out with Batgirl.

The Haunted House

Here’s a new abstract comic, called The Haunted House.

This place clearly tells a story, and the story is evolving.

I pass this house on the train to work. Today, I stopped during both commutes to photograph it. The shady picture is in the morning sun. If you look at the shadow free picture above, you may notice someone did some work on the basement, changing the story somewhat.

When I first saw it, my mind did something like this:

It’s an instant abstract comic, naturally formed and observed in nature.   I stared while photographing this space and my mind wandered around those rooms, wondering what other stories they tell. The ghosts that haunt this place must be disturbed it has changed so much. I suppose they are waterproof.

Some details:

Several iterations of the kitchen decor are visible. It’s like a history lesson. Dig that beautiful paper – I’d never cover that up, if it were mine.

Those are some gorgeous colors, when viewed this way in the open air. Enjoy it before it’s gone forever.

On Deck

During a recent trip to the local hardware supply super store on official circus peanut business, my little one pilfered these paint chips to “make some art.” I couldn’t be more proud.

And, looking at them on the kitchen table, it stuck me that they already tell a story. Here’s a new abstract comic.