The Ghost of Triton

The Ghost of Triton

My dad and I used to eat smokey kippered herring on saltines, when I was a kid. The tins came with a key that would open the can. If you didn’t do it correctly, a little metal tab would snap off and it was difficult to get the can open.

This scene shows the ghost of Triton, haunting his old haunt. He’s accompanied by old friends. All the eyes glow in the dark. All the eyes except his.

Triton, detail - top of diorama

Triton, detail - middle of diorama

Triton, detail - bottom of diorama

Drink like a Fish!

Here is another piece that is part of the ArtScape exhibition Ebb & Flow.

Artscape runs from July 17-19. Please go to the Maryland Institute College of Art’s Fox Building; 1301 Mt. Royal Avenue, Baltimore, MD  21217.

My original sketches have a lot of sea detritus to accompany this fishwife. I opted to go with “less is more” and left it out of the final version (although I did enjoy cutting out several fish skeletons).

This is the first diorama I’ve completed in one of several copper and aluminum fish molds that I recently acquired.

drinker-set-em-updrink-like-a-fish drinker-WIPdrinker-scales

Her scales alone took me (almost) 3 days to complete. I made each row separately and attached with shims underneath to raise them ever so slightly.

featured-drinkerdrinker-finished-white-background Drinker-full-red

I also have spoons in this show, all of which are for sale. I hope to see you at Artscape!

Glass Half _______

This is an idea I presented for this summer’s Artscape “Ebb and Flow” exhibit in Baltimore. I filled a glass to exactly the halfway point – the viewer’s job is to fill in the blank: half what? Full? Empty? Both full AND empty?

Water is the most valuable fluid (and, really, substance) on the planet. We are made of water. And yet, there are huge piles of trash floating in the ocean. I recently met with some research faculty that discovered horrible bacteria in the Chesapeake Bay (and Atlantic Ocean) which is a truly lethal byproduct of fertilizer run-off.

This piece wasn’t accepted for the exhibit. But it’s still worth thinking about our water.

 

The Fishwife

Cento makes small, single serving size tuna cans, which happen to work well for dioramas. One of the things I like about this piece was cutting out all the scales on the fish.

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full-view

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wife