Icons: web design influencing print

On my way to work yesterday, I noticed three instances where, it seemed to me, that print design is being informed by web design. Specifically, the prominent use of icons. I had my camera and took a few pictures. I’ll post more as I notice them.

Icons are used all over the place on the web. They offer visual references in navigation, content identification and add a little jazz to a page for little bandwidth cost. Sites like Icon Buffet offer people the chance to download free icons and trade with other community users.

Icons from Icon Buffett

So it makes sense, I suppose, that icons are creeping into packaging and branding. Drop shadows, curved corners and sequential numbering make me want to click on the box of this dishwasher soap:

dishwasher soap packaging

I want to click the “links” in the “header” of the box shown below:

Whole grain makes the whole day go better

They work just as well in signage, and this isn’t new of course. A look tells me quickly that I can get coffee, money and snacks here.

Put a tiger in your tank

I went to the web sites for these products and found that the branding there (which looks a little corporate and dated to my eyes) did not reflect the packaging.

I’ve also noticed web like layouts in some magazines. Paper versions of mail-order catalogs are closely coordinated with the web counterparts, and the visual similarities are easy to identify.